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Week Four: Madness in the Age of Reason

This week in our lecture and associated tutorial session (in the the following week) we will explore the following questions:

  • What did Foucault mean when he spoke of a great confinement have occurred in Europe by the late eighteenth century?
  • On the basis of your reading, would you agree that the treatment of madness in eighteenth century Britain was more to do with managing the insane than attempting to find cures for their conditions?
  • Did wider currents of Enlightenment thought change the treatment of madness?
  • What insights does Foucault's writings on madness offer the historian?

The text of the much abridged English translation of Foucault's History of Madness, published as Madness and Civilization is available online via the UQ Library

However, participants in this course would do well to acquire their own paperback copy of Madness and Civilization .

On Foucault and His History of Madness

See the article on Foucault and Madness in Gutting, Gary. 2005. The Cambridge Companion to Foucault. Cambridge companions to philosophy. 2nd ed. Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press.Available online via UQ Library

The following articles are available online via the UQ Library:

Castel, Robert, and Anthony Cheal Pugh. 1990. The two readings of 'histoire de la folie' in France. History of the Human Sciences 3, (1) (02): 27-30.

Gordon, Colin. 1990. 'Histoire de la folie:' an unknown book by Michel Foucault. History of the Human Sciences 3, (1) (02): 3-26.

---. 1990. History, madness and other errors: A response. History of the Human Sciences 3, (3) (08): 381-96.

LaCapra, Dominick. 1990. Foucault, history, and madness. History of the Human Sciences 3, (1) (02): 3-38.

Merquior, J. G. 1990. Back to the 'histoire de la folie.'. History of the Human Sciences 3, (1) (02): 39-40.

Pearson, Geoffrey. 1990. Misunderstanding foucault. History of the Human Sciences 3, (3) (08): 363-71.

Porter, Roy. 1990. Foucault's great confinement. History of the Human Sciences 3, (1) (02): 47-54.

Rose, Nikolas. 1990. Of madness itself: 'histoire de la folie' and the object of psychiatric history. History of the Human Sciences 3, (3) (08): 373-80.

Scull, Andrew. 1990. Michel foucault's history of madness. History of the Human Sciences 3, (1) (02): 57-67.

On Madness and its Treatment in Britain during the Eighteenth Century

The following articles are available online via UQ Library:

Andrews, Jonathan. 1990. In her vapours . . . or indeed in her madness"? mrs clerke's case: An early eighteenth century psychiatric controversy. History of Psychiatry 1, (1) (03): 125-43.

Dacome, Lucia. 2004. ' To what purpose does it think?': Dreams, sick bodies and confused minds in the age of reason. History of Psychiatry 15, (4) (12): 395-416.

Laffey, Paul. 2003. Two registers of madness in Enlightenment Britain. part 2. History of Psychiatry 14, (1) (03): 63-81.

---. 2002. Two registers of madness in enlightenment britain. part 1. History of Psychiatry 13, (4) (12): 367-80.

Porter, Roy. 1998. Madness and the family before Freud: The view of the mad-doctors. Journal of Family History 23, (2) (04): 159.

---. 1981. Being mad in Georgian England. History Today 31, (12) (12): 42.

Scull, Andrew. 1990. Michel Foucault's history of madness. History of the Human Sciences 3, (1) (02): 57-67.

---. 1983. The domestication of madness. Medical History 27, (3) (07): 233-48.

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